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Interns for the Pound Ridge Land Conservancy shared the work they completed on the town’s preserves over the summer during a virtual presentation held via Zoom last week. Although it was an unusual season due to COVID-19, Land Steward Andrew Morgan said interns Jacob Adams, Andrew Miller and…

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I know that I’m not the only one to be focusing more on the natural world during these strange pandemic times. There are less distractions, of course, but also the comfort of all those plants and animals going about their business, unaffected by this virus. Nature will do just fine without u…

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If there were a title for “master monarch butterfly whisperer,” University of Connecticut’s Alice Ely would have already taken the prize. In addition to being an advanced master gardener, UConn Master Composter 2018, and gardens chair at Westport’s Wakeman Town Farm, Ms. Ely is also the crea…

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In the northeast we are fortunate to have our forests growing older. As forests age, soils become more complex, topography more undulating, species composition more diverse, and the layering of the forest more apparent — herbaceous, understory and overstory habitats more defined. One indicat…

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The influx of people on local preserves is no surprise to Pound Ridge resident Sansan Harashima, who understands the notion of turning to nature for solace and comfort during crisis quite well.

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Nature enthusiasts around the world were busy bees the last weekend of April, participating in the iNaturalist City Nature Challenge to document biodiversity in their communities.

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Often I write about my successes as a naturalist. There was my time in Tasmania, for instance, when I got up before dawn, staked out a platypus and actually saw one. I’ve sat in a blind, and witnessed and photographed the drumming of ruffed grouse. I also recounted the memorable day during m…

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Long ago, on a particular day when John F. Kennedy was president of the United States and I was a little boy, my mother took me to the doctor’s office. There I was encouraged to swallow what I remember to be a thimble-sized cup of sweet yellow or orange fluid. It was a polio vaccine, made fr…

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The New York New Jersey Trail Conference recognized George Scott at their Volunteer Appreciation Event on March 8 at the New Jersey Botanical Gardens.  He received the organization’s Dedicated Service Award, along with nine others, which honors volunteers who demonstrate exemplary service to…

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The Hudson Valley is known for its lush vegetation and impressive forestry, but local environmentalists are becoming increasingly concerned this distinguishing feature might literally die away. That’s because our trees, all while producing oxygen and food and providing shade, are battling ag…

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If you’re going to buy just one tool for pruning, make it a pair of hand-held pruning shears. This is the tool you’ll use for pruning roses and for the majority of cuts on fruit plants, houseplants, and young ornamental trees and bushes.

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Whether you call these birds woodpeckers, as I do, or peckerwoods, as some of my neighbors in Mississippi did when I worked as a park ranger at Gulf Islands National Seashore, they peck wood for their livings, each species in a distinctive way. There’s the yellow-bellied sapsucker, for examp…